Chorizo is a big deal here in South Texas.  The regional version is a more laid back sausage than its Spanish ancestor, but it packs a punch.  Although it comes in a casing, it is usually cooked like a ground meat broken up, and quite greasy.  Unlike Spanish chorizo, it is not cured or dried.  It is a common breakfast food served mixed in with scrambled eggs, or with refried beans in a flour tortilla, or with breakfast potatoes on the side.  It adds a spicy vinegary flavor, and is usually deep orange-red and full of chili powder, cumin, and garlic. Tlacuache loves the chorizo from the San Manuel chorizo factory on I-37 South (between San Antonio and McAllen).  He says he prefers it…